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EPI Graduate Assistantships

The Energy Policy Institute (EPI) is hiring Graduate Assistants for Spring 2020, with the possibility of renewal for Summer 2020 or the following school year. We seek applicants with a strong interest in energy; demonstrated ability to think critically, to write well and to perform analysis; as well as a capacity to work flexibly as a team player or independently (as needed) in an advancing Institute. Students with strengths in qualitative, quantitative or geospatial methods are invited to apply. Solid experience in GIS analysis and/or statistical analysis is preferred.

Eligibility

Applicants must be able to commit to 20 hours a week, admitted to the Boise State University Graduate College and fully admitted to their degree program, carrying at least 9 graduate credit hours during a GA-relevant semester of the school year, and not be working for the University in another paid role (contact us with questions).

Successful applicants will support a range of projects. Depending on experience and timelines, sample projects may include studies on critical infrastructure and system risk, energy industrial development and jobs, or aspects of energy adoption. One hire will support a two-year project funded by the Sloan Foundation on regional electricity markets and the relationship of different governance regimes to market outcomes.

We encourage applicants from all graduate programs and disciplines to apply.

EPI’s Graduate Assistants (GAs) receive competitive hourly pay, tuition (in or out-of-state), and student fees for the given semester. Renewal for subsequent semesters is contingent upon satisfactory performance and budget. In return, the appointment requires a 20-hour per week commitment for research activities, as noted above, at EPI during the school year.

To apply

Send a 1) cover letter, 2) resume, 3) writing sample, and 4) recent transcript (unofficial acceptable) by email to Kathy Araujo, kathleenaraujo@boisestate.edu. One PDF with all four documents is preferred. The cover letter should include: which graduate program you are in and when you expect to graduate, your research experience, plus interest/experience in energy, and why you are interested in working at EPI. Review begins immediately.

For questions, contact Kathy Araujo, kathleenaraujo@boisestate.edu. Deadline for Spring 2020: 11/27/19.

EPI Overview

The Institute is a professional research and advising center that is the policy arm for the Center for Advanced Energy Studies.* We produce research and policy-relevant work on energy decision-making, including social and technical aspects of energy systems change. We are performance-oriented and deadline-driven.

*CAES is a consortium of public universities in the Intermountain West plus Idaho National Laboratory.

Hult Prize Competition at Boise State

The Boise State organizers are currently accepting applicants for the 2020 Hult Prize competition and are eagerly recruiting engineering students.

The Hult Prize is an international social innovation and entrepreneurship challenge. Students compete in a pitch competition every fall for exposure of ideas, seed money for social impact-focused businesses, and the potential for a 1-million-dollar prize in the final round.

Boise State students have participated in the past which has allowed national and international exposure for our school. This year we would love to send someone to represent Boise State at a regional or national level.

We will be hosting a Hult Prize competition on-campus December 6 from 4-6 pm, and we need 15 teams pitching their ideas for this event to be viable.

For more information on the Hult Prize, here is a website link http://www.hultprize.org/ and here is the 2019 challenge page http://www.hultprize.org/challenge/.

For more information

Tshering Tashi Sherpa
*Graduate Assistant, *Management Department
Boise State University
(646)286-5307
tsheringsherpa@boisestate.edu

ANR Summer 2020 Internships

ANR Group Inc. has contracts with CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), the Department of Energy – Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Department of Energy – Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP), and Mission Support Alliance (MSA) to recruit students for their summer intern programs on the Department of Energy’s Hanford site in Richland, WA.

Hanford, WA Manhattan Project National Historic Site

These companies are responsible for clean-up activities on the Hanford site.

  • DOE oversees the projects associated with cleaning up the reactors, soil, groundwater, solid waste burial sites, and also manages the demolition of facilities, and the disposition of the remaining plutonium left on the site.
  • MSA is responsible for services such as safeguards and security, environmental integration, site infrastructure, and utilities, site business management, information resources and content management and portfolio management.
  • CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is responsible for waste retrieval and fuels management, groundwater and vadose zone remediation, demolition of facilities and canyons, and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant

These intern programs allow students to obtain real-world experience in their field of study and each intern is assigned a mentor that works with the student during the entire internship. In addition to gaining valuable experience, the interns are paid for the hours they work.

All internships are paid; for example, a junior Engineer salary ranges from $18.00/hr. to $25.00/hr., while senior-level students to Grad students can earn $20.00/hr. to $ 32.00/hr. No exact number is available yet on how many internship positions will be offered, but ANR had 90+ positions this last year and we expect about that same number this year.

Students that are looking for an internship can visit the ANR internship website (www.anrinterns.com) to get more information and apply for the program. Students can also contact Aryn Stone directly at 509-946-1725, or via e-mail at aryns@anrgroupinc.com

For more information

Aryn Stone | Internship Program Coordinator
ANR Group Inc
295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 103, Richland, WA 99352
Office: 509.946.1725 |Fax: 509.946.7132
E-mail: aryns@anrgroupinc.com Web: www.anrinterns.com

INL 2020 Summer Internship Recruitment

INL is recruiting interns for next summer on a greatly accelerated timeline with special focus on Idaho schools.  They’d like applications by December 1, and are trying to notify folks in January.

The link for more information and the application is below:

https://inl.taleo.net/careersection/inl_intern/jobdetail.ftl?job=13709&tz=GMT-06%3A00&tzname=America%2FBoise

Typical Degree Programs Sought Include:

  • Computational Sciences for Materials Science
  • Structural Engineering
  • Seismic Analysis
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering Fluid Dynamics & Structural Mechanics
  • Nuclear Engineering
  • Physics
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Energy Technology
  • Vehicle Technology
  • Energy Storage

Questions?

If you have any questions, please contact:

Mendi Edgar
Associate Director, Research Computing
Boise State University
Phone: (208) 918-1398
Email: MendiEdgar@boisestate.edu

Global Citizenship class includes service project in Belize

ENGR 373/GLOBAL 497 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Mondays 9:00-11:45

Learn a collaborative approach for addressing the global issues of poverty and inequity on a global platform. This course explores social responsibility from the context of integrated business, public policy, education, health, and engineering systems.

All students are required to participate in the international servicer spring break trip to Corozal, Belize. Due to the uniqueness of this requirement, students are required to meet all required University policy requirements for study abroad.


Special Information Session

Wednesday, November 6
Noon until 1:00 PM
SMASH 201

Spring 2020 peer educators and graders sought

Image of a college male student carrying his backpack and books

MBE is recruiting students specifically trained to provide academic support in engineering areas. Similar to the existing Learning Assistant program currently running at the university level, ME peer educators provide tutoring sessions in several ME areas. Students are also being sought to support classroom efforts by grading and assisting professors with ME courses.

Peer Educators

Applications are being accepted for the following peer educator positions:

  • ME 302 Thermodynamics 1 (Plumlee)
  • ME 320 Heat Transfer (Pakala)
  • ME 330 Fluid Mechanics (Ferguson)
  • ME 350 Mechanics of Materials (Howe)
  • ME 352 Machine Design 1 (Guarino)
  • ME 380 Kinematics and Machine Dynamics (Deng)

Apply for Job #3269707 through the Career Services website: https://career.boisestate.edu/welcome-to-handshake-student-and-alumni/

Graders

Applications are being accepted for the following grader positions:

  • ENGR 210 Engineering Statics (Haight)
  • ENGR 220 Engineering Dynamics (Hagemeier)
  • ME 105 Mechanical Engineering Graphics (adjuncts)
  • ME 271 Introduction to Computation for Engineers (graduate assistant)
  • ME 302 Thermodynamics 1 (Plumlee)
  • ME 320 Heat Transfer (Pakala)
  • ME 330 Fluid Mechanics (Ferguson)
  • ME 331 Fluid Mechanics Lab (graduate assistant)
  • ME 350 Mechanics of Materials (Howe)
  • ME 352 Machine Design 1 (Guarino)
  • ME 360 System Modeling and Control (Gardner)
  • ME 380 Kinematics and Machine Dynamics (Deng)
  • ME 424 Thermal and Fluids Systems Design (Ferguson)
  • ME 462 Machine Design 2 (Guarino)

Apply for Job #3269593 through the Career Services website: https://career.boisestate.edu/welcome-to-handshake-student-and-alumni/

Spring Energy Elective

21st Century Opportunities and Challenges in Energy — Strategic Decision-making about Systems Change

Overview

Trade-offs in energy strategies are the focus of this interdisciplinary course. Whether the aim is modernization, cleaner energy or security, decision-makers must choose among options. How do we ensure that there is reliable and affordable energy? How do we consider natural resource and/or regional limits? To what degree is resilience or flexibility critical for our system, and how do we evaluate the competing interests?

This course will expose students to a range of international complexities in energy. Using a socio-technical systems approach, students will examine societal and industry objectives, explore tools and metrics, consider tradeoffs at meta- and micro-levels, and gain insight into interactions and cascade effects. In doing so, students will refine skills in energy analysis and critical thinking. Infrastructure, technology, and behavior will be covered in the context of policy and markets. Prerequisite: Interest in critically thinking about energy.

Course Information

Course Number(s):
Graduate (3 units): PUBADM 581-001, ECON 597-001, ENGR 597-003, HES tbd

Undergraduate (3 units): ENVSTD 498-006 (16277), GLOBAL 498-005 (16276), POLS 498-001 (16302), URBAN 497, ECON 497, ENGR 497, HES tbd

Instructor: Kathy Araujo (SPS/EPI), 908 Yankee Building, kathleenaraujo@boisestate.edu

Time: Spring 2020, Wednesdays, 6:00-8:45 pm

Location: EDUC 223

Questions?

For more information on this course, please contact Dr. John Gardner (jgardner@boisestate.edu).


Spring NASA Internships

Image of the NASA logo

The Idaho Space Grant Consortium (ISGC) has made us aware of a couple of NASA internship opportunities during the Spring 2020 semester in Cleveland, OH. This would involve being physically away from Boise State University but it could be a great experience if your interests are in aerospace. These are paid internships; undergraduates receive $730 per week, graduate students receive $900 per week.

  • U.S. citizenship is required.
  • Interested students should contact isgc@uidaho.edu
  • Though the deadline to apply is November 5th,  we strongly encourage students to apply before November 1

Internship # 1: Reduced Gravity Cryogenic Transfer Project

Type: Internship
Session: Spring 2020
Center: Glenn Research Center

Description

NASA maintains a strong desire to develop technology that will enable future in-space cryogenic propulsion systems. Of interest in the current project is the role of boiling heat transfer during cryogenic propellant storage and transfer. Due to the low normal boiling point of all cryogens, they are particularly susceptible to boiling heat transfer. For example, during propellant tank chilldown, fluid that comes in contact with the hot tank walls will boil vigorously. Meanwhile, in microgravity where the liquid vapor interface inside the tank is unknown, tank fill must be done with the vent valve closed to avoid venting liquid. The combination of cryogenic fluid and large temperature differences between liquid and tank imply that there will be complex flow boiling, heat transfer, and two-phase flow patterns. Accurate, reliable cryogenic pool boiling heat transfer correlations are thus required to design, size, and analyze NASA’s future cryogenic propulsion system architectures. The penalty for poor models results in higher safety margin (size depot larger to carry more propellant), higher safety factor (more insulation needed, which increases launch vehicle mass), and higher cost. Current models used in thermal design codes are based on room temperature fluids, and not backed by cryogenic data. It has been shown that cryogenic pool and flow boiling data deviates substantially from room temperature-based boiling models. Furthermore, NASA is developing a testbed to prove out tank chilldown and fill injection methods and chilldown methods. This flight rig is currently being designed. Selected student will be assisting lead cryogenic propulsion scientists to: 1. Develop and validate a so-called thermal nonequilibrium universal no-vent fill model, anchored to data, capable of modeling any fluid injector (spray bar, diffuser, jet, etc.), any fluid, and any fill method. 2. Analyze new reduced gravity cryogenic two-phase flow transfer data to determine gravitational sensitivities and trends. 3. Contribute to the design and analysis of an in-house built low-gravity tank-to-tank transfer experiment. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop accurate, low-error, data-anchored tools that can be used to size future cryogenic propellant based transfer systems. This internship is applicable to the GRC’s core competencies of: 1. In-space propulsion and cryogenic fluid management The expected outcomes are as follows: (1) Update Glenn’s database of cryogenic tank chilldown and fill data with the newest datasets, (2) Develop the universal no-vent fill model capable of modeling any fluid injector (spray bar, diffuser, jet, etc.), any fluid, and any fill method, (3) a high quality write up of the new reduced gravity line chilldown data analysis, along with uncertainty analysis on the data, (4) a high quality write up on the universal no-vent model.

Computer/Software Skills

It is preferred that the assigned student be of junior, senior, or graduate level and have already taken 1-2 semesters of undergraduate-level Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer. Transport Phenomena can be substituted. The student must be proficient with all basic Microsoft Office programs, specifically Powerpoint, Word, and Excel. Knowledge of Matlab (or equivalent data processing/numerical code like Python) is required. The student must have taken at least one semester in numerical techniques, or have a working knowledge of basic statistics, curve fitting techniques, basic optimization. A basic understanding of two-phase flow is also desirable but not required.

Academic Level(s):
College Junior; College Senior; Master’s; Doctorate

Major(s):
Engineering – Aerospace / Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering; Engineering – Chemical; Engineering – Mechanical; Engineering – Physics

Mission directorate(s) directly benefiting from the tasks involved in this internship:
Human Exploration and Operations Mission
Space Technology Mission


Internship # 2: Superconducting Coil Testing and Modeling for Future Electric Aircraft

Type: Internship
Session: Spring 2020
Center: Glenn Research Center

Description

NASA maintains a strong desire to develop technology that will enable future hybrid-electric aircraft. Why electric? There are fewer emissions, less atmospheric heat release, quieter flight, better energy conservation, and more reliable systems. Currently, the largest contributor to fuel consumption is the large single-aisle class. One particular electric aircraft vehicle concept of interest is the fully superconducting aircraft, which relies on high performing superconducting (SC) components such as wires and stator or rotor coils that are used to transfer power throughout the aircraft. Recently a test rig named ICE BOX was designed and built to test components at cryogenic temperatures without the use of a hazardous fluid, allowing rapid testing. ICE BOX uses cryocoolers to chill down an interface plate where samples can be mounted and tested at reduced temperature. Tests on various SC coils, under different thermal and magnetic conditions are required in order to provide data for researchers and designers of future SC aircraft. In addition to testing, time permitting, the student will help cryogenic researchers at NASA develop a set of equations fit to cryogenic pool boiling data. Accurate, reliable heat transfer correlations are needed to model film and nucleate boiling to understand how to effectively cool superconducting coils in-flight applications where the propellant such as liquid hydrogen might be used as a fuel and as a cooling medium. Appropriate non-dimensional numbers will be identified, statistical analysis will be carried out to find the best-fit equations to available, existing cryogenic pool boiling data. In short, the selected student will be assisting lead cryogenic scientists to conduct testing and develop fundamental models for superconducting aircraft technology development at a fundamental level. This internship is applicable to the GRC’s core competencies of: 1. Aeronautics 2. Cryogenic fluid management 3. Power, energy conversion 4. Green propellants There are two expected outcomes of this internship. One is a detailed report of test results, experimental methodology, uncertainty analysis, etc. Second outcome is the written results of the pool boiling correlation development and comparison to data.

Computer/Software Skills

It is preferred that the assigned student be of junior or senior status and have already taken 1-2 semesters of undergraduate-level Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, and Circuits and Control. The student must be proficient with all basic Microsoft Office programs, specifically Powerpoint, Word, and Excel. Knowledge of Matlab (or equivalent data processing/numerical code) is required. The student must have taken at least one semester in numerical techniques and have working knowledge of basic statistics, curve fitting techniques, and basic optimization. A basic understanding of two-phase flow is also desirable but not required.

Academic Level(s):
College Junior; College Senior; Master’s

Major(s):
Engineering – Aerospace / Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering; Engineering – Chemical; Engineering – Electrical / Electronics / Communications Engineering; Engineering – Mechanical; Engineering – Physics

Mission directorate(s) directly benefiting from the tasks involved in this internship:
Aeronautics Research Mission


Questions?

Contact isgc@uidaho.edu

Seminar: Dr. Vincent Leung

Wednesday, October 23 at 10:30 AM in Ruch 103

From Cellphone Transceivers to Wireless Brain Implants – A Designer’s Journey

Smartphones are arguably the most beloved gadget of our times. Having designed generations of radio frequency (RF) transceiver integrated circuits (ICs) used in a vast majority of cellular phones today, Dr. Leung will recount some of the architecture and circuit design advancements that have helped to fuel the wireless revolution. Over the years, an increasing amount of functionalities have been packed into a smaller chip area, all while maintaining superb RF performances, essentially achieving Gb/s wireless communication.

More recently, Dr. Leung has been engaged in the design of wireless brain-implant ICs. While the system presents its unique challenges in energy harvesting, RF telemetry, and networking, the push towards more compact, higher bandwidth RF IC remains unchanged. Dr. Leung will describe some of the early circuit design and experimental results of this research. These prototypes may usher in a wireless revolution for a brain-machine interface, perhaps similar to the way that wired telephony has been replaced by a wireless network.

Dr. Vincent Leung graduated with his PhD from University of California San Diego in 2004. His experience includes 16 years of industrial analog/ RF IC design. In 2016, he joined the UCSD’s Qualcomm Institute as the Technical Director of Circuits Lab, where he currently works to pursues his interest in academic research and teaching. At Qualcomm, he has held many key design and lead positions for 3G/4G RF transceiver chips, which were employed in a great majority of the smartphones at the time. He has over 30 publications and 13 US patents.


Presented by the Boise State Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. See their full seminar schedule here.

Law School Fair 2019

October 31, 2019 – 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Boise State Student Union – Simplot Ballroom

Interested in law school? Programs are actively seeking engineers and those interested in cybersecurity for a career in law. This is a unique opportunity to explore what a career in law and engineering would look like!

  • over 30 law schools from across the country will be represented
  • great information for Sophomores and Juniors
  • ask questions and learn more about a school that interests you

Free Pre-Law Dinner

Join your peers at a free dinner on October 30, 2019 at 6:00 PM in the Hatch D Ballroom. Open to all students.

More information

To see attending schools: coas.boisestate.edu/advising and click “Law School Fair”

Questions? Contact College of Arts & Sciences at 208.426.2663 or coas-advising@boisestate.edu

Sponsored by the Western Association of Prelaw Advisors (WAPLA), Boise State University’s Pre-Law Society and College of Arts and Sciences

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